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John McPhee wrote a book titled “Coming into the Country” that described his travels to Alaska, and the many people he met there (although some of the people I met complained that he tended to “merge” people, adding stories from one person to one of his main characters—to keep the story lines cleaner—but to the dismay and anger of some of those who met him)…

I’m on precisely the opposite kind of a journey—leaving the country—heading south in an overloaded 1984 camper van—a repeat of a trip I took nearly a year ago—this time a little slower, taking time to stop for at least a few pictures…

I don’t usually blog in real time, but I’m about half way through the trip, with a campsite with Wi-Fi, too tired to drive, waiting for the van to cool off before we try to sleep in it..

Tanana River View, July 27, 2013

Tanana River View, July 27, 2013

 

Alaska Highway, Near the border, July 27, 2013

Alaska Highway, Near the border, July 27, 2013

 

Kulane Lake, Yukon Territory, July 28, 2013

Kulane Lake, Yukon Territory, July 28, 2013

 

Burn, BC, July 29, 2013

Burn, Cassiar Highway,  BC, July 29, 2013

 

Cottonwood River, Cassiar Highway, BC, July 29, 2013

Cottonwood River, Cassiar Highway, BC, July 29, 2013

 

Mountains and Lake, Cassiar Highway, July 30, 2013

Mountains and Lake, Cassiar Highway, July 30, 2013

 

Power Line Construction, Cassiar Highway, July 30, 2013

Power Line Construction, Cassiar Highway, July 30, 2013

 

Hayfield and Mountains, BC, July 30, 2013

Hayfield and Mountains, BC, July 30, 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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2 Comments

  1. Thanks for sharing the great pictures. You are the first person who has ever mentioned reading McPhee’s book “Coming into the Country”. I have an old copy here at the cabin that is held together with some duct-tape.

    • Marvin Falk
    • Posted July 30, 2013 at 9:16 pm
    • Permalink

    I like the concept of coming out of the country. I will be most interested in your thoughts as a photographer and critic about the country, and photography of the country, as you move further away in time.


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